A ray of sunshine on an overcast day.

A ray of sunshine on an overcast day.

Kota Ezawa’s large-scale wooden tableau pictures a diverse group of people with hands raised in the ritual act of voting. The work is a visual representation of democracy by one of its most prevalent signifiers: the vote. “Hand Vote” functions as a monument to the people, a symbol of collective governance. The flat, plywood construction is evocative of a stage set or temporary façade with the underlying support structure intentionally exposed to view, suggesting the volatile nature of democracy. Ezawa’s portrait speaks directly to (home)land as an ideal projected upon the nation’s capital. On a parallel note, the work can also be viewed as a tongue-in-cheek reference to the District’s lack of voting representation. #dc #dcarts #5x5dc #taxationwithoutrepresentation #notaxationwithoutrepresentation #kotaezawa #homeland

Kota Ezawa’s large-scale wooden tableau pictures a diverse group of people with hands raised in the ritual act of voting. The work is a visual representation of democracy by one of its most prevalent signifiers: the vote. “Hand Vote” functions as a monument to the people, a symbol of collective governance. The flat, plywood construction is evocative of a stage set or temporary façade with the underlying support structure intentionally exposed to view, suggesting the volatile nature of democracy. Ezawa’s portrait speaks directly to (home)land as an ideal projected upon the nation’s capital. On a parallel note, the work can also be viewed as a tongue-in-cheek reference to the District’s lack of voting representation. #dc #dcarts #5x5dc #taxationwithoutrepresentation #notaxationwithoutrepresentation #kotaezawa #homeland

Walking man - - - - Washington, DC (Navy Yard) 2014 (Gary Tharaldson)

Walking man - - - - Washington, DC (Navy Yard) 2014 (Gary Tharaldson)

The early worm get the bird?
#SignsOfHomelessness

The early worm get the bird?

#SignsOfHomelessness

I checked in on him and his new stand today….he told me he got a $100 tip after giving $8 shoe shine yesterday…

I checked in on him and his new stand today….he told me he got a $100 tip after giving $8 shoe shine yesterday…

Today I was blessed to run into these three gentlemen.  The one in the middle, his name is Ollie Santos, a lawyer at the Department of Justice.  Five years ago Ollie heard about 10 year old triplet brothers who were blind and were in need of a loving family to care for them.
Pictured here are Leo and Nick…their brother Steven was at band practice today and couldn’t make the trip with their dad Ollie.
We had a great talk and afterwards I asked for a couple of pictures and they couldn’t be happier to oblige me.
As I snapped off a few shots, Leo asked with eyebrows raised, “Is that a Canon?”
"Indeed it is!" I replied.  Just an amazing day.  Great to be alive in this fine country of ours.

Today I was blessed to run into these three gentlemen.  The one in the middle, his name is Ollie Santos, a lawyer at the Department of Justice.  Five years ago Ollie heard about 10 year old triplet brothers who were blind and were in need of a loving family to care for them.

Pictured here are Leo and Nick…their brother Steven was at band practice today and couldn’t make the trip with their dad Ollie.

We had a great talk and afterwards I asked for a couple of pictures and they couldn’t be happier to oblige me.

As I snapped off a few shots, Leo asked with eyebrows raised, “Is that a Canon?”

"Indeed it is!" I replied.  Just an amazing day.  Great to be alive in this fine country of ours.

Tater-tot

Tater-tot

Just a boy and his skateboard.

Just a boy and his skateboard.

Cleaner than it looks.  Or is it? 

Cleaner than it looks.  Or is it? 

Distortion

Distortion

Random team building events in Navy Yard area!  Egggcelent!

Random team building events in Navy Yard area!  Egggcelent!

Beautifully hot afternoon in down town…great day to be alive…..and wet!

Beautifully hot afternoon in down town…great day to be alive…..and wet!

The Library of Congress can be an exciting and eye opening trip.  Trust me.

The Library of Congress can be an exciting and eye opening trip.  Trust me.

In 1905, a Swedish immigrant by the name of Martis Jerk came to America from Dalarna, Sweden. He changed his name to Eric Carl Wickman when entering the country which was a common pracitce among immigrants at the time in fear of being labeled as a “foreigner.” He then dropped the first name of Eric and went simply by Carl Wickman.
In 1914, Carl Wickman was laid off from the Alice mine where he worked as a drill operator. In his free time, he noticed that many miners had a problem getting to and from work. An idea sprung up in his head that if he were to sell a vehicle that would be reasonably priced as well as effecient in getting the miners to and from work on time, he would not need to go back to the underground mines where it was often dangerous. So in 1914, Wickman became a salesman for the Hupmobile and also a partnership owner in the company. The Hupmobile never sold well.
In 1915, after seeing the failing sales of the seven passenger Hupmobile, he tried to show his clients what a great product the Hupmobile was by literally giving them rides to and from work for a cheap fifteen cents a ride. When he found out that giving the miners transportation was more profit producing, Wickman created the Mesaba Transportation Company. Carl Wickman did have a partner int his business that little is ever talked about named Andrew “Bus Andy” Anderson.
Three years after starting the company, Wickman was running 18 buses and was making $40,000. In 1922, He sold the company for $60,000.
In 1933, the company was formally named The Greyhound Corporation and was running nationally.
In 1954, Carl Wickman passed away and it made national headlines appearing in the New York Times in the February 6, 1954 edition.
Today, Hibbing is the home to the Greyhound Bus Origin Museum but that museum’s history is a story in itself which we will get to in a bit. The museum is believed to be located right on the original path that Wickman used to run his transit lines.
 Source: Greyhound Bus Origin Museum & Wikipedia; 1 & 2

In 1905, a Swedish immigrant by the name of Martis Jerk came to America from Dalarna, Sweden. He changed his name to Eric Carl Wickman when entering the country which was a common pracitce among immigrants at the time in fear of being labeled as a “foreigner.” He then dropped the first name of Eric and went simply by Carl Wickman.

In 1914, Carl Wickman was laid off from the Alice mine where he worked as a drill operator. In his free time, he noticed that many miners had a problem getting to and from work. An idea sprung up in his head that if he were to sell a vehicle that would be reasonably priced as well as effecient in getting the miners to and from work on time, he would not need to go back to the underground mines where it was often dangerous. So in 1914, Wickman became a salesman for the Hupmobile and also a partnership owner in the company. The Hupmobile never sold well.

In 1915, after seeing the failing sales of the seven passenger Hupmobile, he tried to show his clients what a great product the Hupmobile was by literally giving them rides to and from work for a cheap fifteen cents a ride. When he found out that giving the miners transportation was more profit producing, Wickman created the Mesaba Transportation Company. Carl Wickman did have a partner int his business that little is ever talked about named Andrew “Bus Andy” Anderson.

Three years after starting the company, Wickman was running 18 buses and was making $40,000. In 1922, He sold the company for $60,000.

In 1933, the company was formally named The Greyhound Corporation and was running nationally.

In 1954, Carl Wickman passed away and it made national headlines appearing in the New York Times in the February 6, 1954 edition.

Today, Hibbing is the home to the Greyhound Bus Origin Museum but that museum’s history is a story in itself which we will get to in a bit. The museum is believed to be located right on the original path that Wickman used to run his transit lines.

 Source: Greyhound Bus Origin Museum & Wikipedia; 12